Episode 9: The End of Colonialism in South Asia

Host: Christopher Rose, Outreach Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Guest: Snehal Shingavi, Assistant Professor, Department of English

Indian medical orderlies attending to wounded soldiers on stretchers outside a dressing station, Mesopotamia, during the First World War.

At the height of the British empire, India was considered the jewel in Britain’s crown. For over 150 years, a handful of British troops maintained control over a country of 300 million. Finally, after two world wars and a popular independence movement, Britain abandoned its imperial project and withdrew from India in 1947. What was Britain’s motivation in keeping India, and how did they accept the inevitability of losing their most valuable colony?

Guest Snehal Shingavi from UT’s Department of English examines the nature of British colonialism in South Asia and its lasting legacy sixty years after decolonization.

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Episode 5: Mapping Perspectives of the Mexican-American War

Host: Christopher Rose, Outreach Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Guest: Chloe Ireton, doctoral student, Department of History

J. Disturnell's 1847 Map of Mexico

This episode looks at US perceptions of Mexico through map making during the US / Mexico War, in which a private publisher sold maps that were reissued annually to reflect ongoing progress in the campaign. Intended for a general, popular audience, these maps served as propaganda in aid of the conflict, but historians and military analysts alike have ignored them until recently—even though they may well have influenced the positioning of the border at the war’s end.

Guest Chloe Ireton looks at the intriguing history of maps as propaganda and the role of two publishing houses—J. Disturnell and Ensigns & Thayer—not only in rewriting the history of the Mexican-American war, but in influencing the outcome of the war even as it was still ongoing.

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Episode 3: The Scramble for Africa

Host: Christopher Rose, Outreach Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Guest: Cacee Hoyer, doctoral student, Department of History

The Rhodes Colossus: Caricature of Cecil John Rhodes, after he announced plans for a telegraph line and railroad from Cape Town to Cairo.Edward Linley Sambourne. The Rhodes Colossus. Cartoon, December 10, 1892. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Punch_Rhodes_Colossus.png.

This episode provides an overview of the Scramble for Africa and how the 1885 Berlin Conference changed European colonialism on the continent. What did colonialism look like before 1885, and how did the Berlin Conference change the ways Europeans behaved? What did colonialism look like in various regions of the continent?  And what are the lingering legacies of colonialism and de-colonization that continue to have an impact on contemporary Africa?

Guest Cacee Hoyer from UT’s Department of History helps explain the Scramble for Africa.

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